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Inage Shrine

Kawasaki Daishi was founded in 1128 by the samurai Hirama Kanenori and the priest Sonken. The temple is the head temple of the Chizan sect of Shingon Buddhism. Kawasaki Daishi is a very popular temple for New Year worship, attracting well over a million supplicants. The principal image for worshippers at Kawasaki Daishi is a statue of Kobo Daishi, supposedly pulled from the sea by Hirama Kanenori, and only displayed in a festival once every ten years. Kawasaki Daishi was destroyed in World War II and the present buildings are modern re-constructions of Heian era architecture.

inage-shrine

The temple buildings include the Dai-Hondo (which contains the sacred image) and was rebuilt in 1958. The Dai-Sanmon (Main Gate) and the Prayer Hall for Safe Driving both constucted in 1977, the Hakkaku Gojunoto (Octagonal Five-Storied Pagoda or Restoration Pagoda) which dates from 1984 and the Statue of Prayer and Peace commissioned by the Head Priest in the same year to commemorate the 1,150th anniversary of Kobo Daishi’s death. Kawasaki Daishi was founded in 1128 by the samurai Hirama Kanenori and the priest Sonken. The temple is the head temple of the Chizan sect of Shingon Buddhism. Kawasaki Daishi is a very popular temple for New Year worship, attracting well over a million supplicants. The principal image for worshippers at Kawasaki Daishi is a statue of Kobo Daishi, supposedly pulled from the sea by Hirama Kanenori, and only displayed in a festival once every ten years.

Kawasaki Daishi was destroyed in World War II and the present buildings are modern re-constructions of Heian era architecture. The temple buildings include the Dai-Hondo (which contains the sacred image) and was rebuilt in 1958. The Dai-Sanmon (Main Gate) and the Prayer Hall for Safe Driving both constucted in 1977, the Hakkaku Gojunoto (Octagonal Five-Storied Pagoda or Restoration Pagoda) which dates from 1984 and the Statue of Prayer and Peace commissioned by the Head Priest in the same year to commemorate the 1,150th anniversary of Kobo Daishi’s death.